UT Medical Center

In 2009, Barber McMurry designed a four- story specialized Heart Hospital for the University of Tennessee Medical Center, creating a distinctive and welcoming “front door” to the hospital campus. By 2016, the facility had reached capacity, but the constrained hospital site limited growth options. Barber McMurry designed a vertical expansion that added five stories and 132,600 additional square feet to the existing building. The project was quickly but carefully completed in phases to allow the Heart Hospital to remain fully operational during construction. The University of Tennessee Medical Center strives to continually improve its facility, providing best-in-class medical operations. The community need to have medical services all in one location isn’t about convenience, it also will improve patient health. Researching the factors that improve a patient’s health was the driving factor behind the expansion of the Heart Hospital. Input was received from physicians, nurses, health care specialists and patients. Rooms were designed with soothing colors, adjustable lighting, and comfortable sofa beds for family members to spend the night. The waiting areas on all levels have been equally improved to accommodate family, friends and caregivers needing breaks. Built-in snack areas make it convenient with the added luxury of meals delivered by the cafeteria during certain hours, reducing time away from the patient. This attention to details for reducing stress, increasing social interaction, and improving access to privacy has been shown to help patients heal. It is crucial to the patient’s healing success is to have doctors, nurses and other medical staff dedicated to working exclusively with cardiovascular disease along with a multidisciplinary approach to care and treatment. The Heart Hospital is within close proximity to the medical center’s cardiovascular intensive care unit, pulmonary unit, cardiac catheterization center, operating rooms, emergency department and UT LIFESTAR allowing ease of access for physicians and staff. Other additions to the Heart Hospital include a new Neuro Intensive Care Unit, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Women’s and Infants unit and the Pulmonary unit. The University of Tennessee Medical Center has a rich history of utilizing evidence-based practices to ensure that we’re delivering the highest quality of care available, and the Heart Hospital represents that commitment to patients. It could be the most important 60 seconds of your life! To survive a heart attack, you need to know the signs and how to respond, well before it ever happens. You can’t afford to wait. Continued Cardiac care is maintenance that we all should do, which was exactly how Freddie Atkins of Madisonville was living his life. With regular visits to his doctor, eating healthy and exercising, the marathon running grandfather was making strides in quality of life. A routine visit triggered a diagnosed need for a stint in his heart and with the latest in innovative procedures at his disposal, it was scheduled at the University of Tennessee Heart Hospital. Dr. Jeffery Johnson, a native of Cleveland, Tennessee provides cardiac care for both Freddie and his wife, Shirley Atkins at University Cardiology. “We completely trust and even enjoy our visits with Dr. Johnson,” said Freddie, “He makes sure we understand everything clearly.” Freddie arrived for the procedure and fully expected to be heading back home in a few hours, however, that changed when the evaluation determined a triple bypass was required, the damage was too great to ignore. It was a sudden change for the man who had created a healthy heart lifestyle and under the best medical care with whom he relied and trusted. Preventative care is key and becuase he had made that a priority, this sudden change was taking place before a life threatening heart event. The University of Tennessee Heart Hospital is a ACS-verified Level 1 Trauma Center, the only one in the area and the first in the state to be awarded The Joint Commission’s Comprehensive Cardiac Center Certification. A huge blessing for East Tennessee residents, the best in cardiac care, prevenative or emergency without having to leave the region. For Freddie, this care was now in the hands of Dr. Ben Barton, his appointed cardiovascular surgeon. Dr. Barton is a 1980 graduate of the UT Medical School followed by a Cardiothoracic residency at the pretigious Emory University. Coming to UT Heart Hospital from Vanderbilt, he provides both excellent patient care and education to future physicians. And so it was, Freddie Atkins was admitted for a triple bypass the next morning. Like the majority of stories from the UT Heart Hospital, Freddie’s is a positive one with a successful surgery leading to the return of a quality daily life. He is continuing cardiac therapy, has returned to independence and building back the active lifestyle so enjoyed. He and his family are grateful for the ability to receive world renowed care close to home, which allowed them to be on the journey together. Freddie Atkins, father of our publisher, who has lived a very active life since retiring from Y-12, is back and better than ever. His marathon heart is beating with love and running the race of life!

Continue Reading →

Having Trouble Seeing Up Close?

By the time we reach our mid-forties, most of us will struggle with seeing things up close. As technology has advanced, we have more and more need to be able to see things up close. We hold our hands in more access to information than ever before. As we use our eyes to view near objects, our focusing system begins to fatigue. Traditionally, as we reach the age of 40-45 years of age, we begin to struggle seeing up close. As this happens, vision correction aids such as bifocals or reading glasses are required to help us focus up close. Fortunately, technology has now provided us more options to maintain clear, comfortable vision up close.Gone are the days of lined bifocals and over-the-counter reading glasses. Progressive eyeglasses and multifocal contact lenses are the modern devices that most people now enjoy to provide comfortable, clear vision at all distances. Even if you never depended on eyeglasses in your youth, you will be challenged with blurry vision up close around the age of 45. With cell phones and computer use, even young people are struggling with blurry vision and eyestrain.Let’s discuss some of the options available to you. Progressive eyeglasses are glasses which provide clear vision at all distances. The design is such that the top part of the lens is focused for distance and as one looks down through the lens, it progressively changes focus for near. Hence the name progressive eyeglasses. For those who don’t like wearing glasses or for those who want to be less dependent on eyeglasses, multifocal contact lenses provide a nice alternative to progressive eyeglasses. Multifocal contact lenses have been around since the 1990’s, but have greatly improved in their design and function since then.Even if you have a significant amount of astigmatism, there are multifocal contact lens options available. You must find an eye doctor who is experienced in fitting specialty contact lenses in order to find success with these lenses. Even if you have tried multifocal contact lenses or progressive eyeglasses in the past and failed, you may be surprised with the success of the new designs. Comfort and clear vision have greatly improved in recent years.If you spend a significant amount of time on a desktop computer, there are specific eyeglasses that are much better suited for this purpose. Computer eyeglasses are a must for anyone spending over four consecutive hours on a computer in a day.If you are struggling with your vision and would like answers, look no further than Premier Eyecare located in Farragut. We want to keep you focused for life. Call today for your appointment. 966-0100 or visit us at www.Premier-Eyecare.net.

Continue Reading →

OsteoStrong

OsteoStrong® is a locally owned franchise with a focus on improving strength, performance, bone density, balance and vitality for clients of any age. It’s a unique place to improve your overall health by focusing on the one thing we all have in common: a skeletal system. OsteoStrong®’s research and technology based system has ushered in a revolution in musculoskeletal strengthening. Bio-Medical engineer, Dr. John Jaquish, invented the Spectrum 2 devices that permits osteogenic loading along the bone axis. This action triggers the body to heal itself through osteogenesis and myofibril growth resulting in denser bones and muscles. Peer reviewed studies indicate bone density increases of 7%-10% per year and muscle density increases that result in significant A1C reduction, the blood glucose marker for Type II diabetes. The method also improves posture, balance and proprioception to reduce the risk of falling. OsteoStrong® of Farragut is the only facility offering this service in East Tennessee. A certified Osteogenic Technician guides the process. Once a week sessions are quick (15 min. or less), sweat- free, painless, and results are measurable. “You don’t have to lift or move weight. It is not a gym.” said the owner, Dee Matchett.Athletic performance is also enhanced and plateaus surmounted. Increased bone density forms a more powerful frame, allowing more muscular engagement and subsequently more muscular power. It is like comparing a Formula 1 race car to an economy car. The framework of the economy car cannot support the power of the Formula 1 racing engine. By comparison, the central nervous system will not permit the muscular system to become strong enough to damage the skeletal system.Osteoporosis runs four generations deep on the paternal side of Dee Matchett’s family. Her great- grandparents were so bowed they had to crane their neck to look up at people. Experiencing firsthand the effects of poor bone health, Dee actively participated in prevention regimens with bone healthy foods, recommended supplements, weight lifting and high impact experience. Despite all those efforts, she was diagnosed as high risk for fracture; genetics were getting the upper hand. “I was surprised when my DXA report showed that I was high risk for fracture,” expressed Dee, “I found myself pondering what else could be done to prevent bone loss.”Her search led to a technological advance in building bone mass density: OsteoStrong® Bringing this method of triggering new bone growth to East Tennessee, became her passion. That passion has become a career for Dee Matchett. Even more so, it has become a motivation for community service. She serves as a volunteer peer educator for American Bone Health, a member of the Knoxville Senior Safety Task Force, a sponsor of FHS Health Occupations Students of America chapter, and a volunteer instructor at ORICL where she teaches a community education course called “Good News for Bones.” As a former instructor at Carson Newman University, her background in education has served her well and she is often asked to speak at various community groups in the area. You may have heard Kim Hansard interview her on the public affairs segment of Star 101.2If you have low bone density, American Bone Health recommends working with a professional on any activity that will add load to your bones. You want to use proper form and body mechanics to protect your spine. “This is what we provide at OsteoStrong® of Farragut,” Dee explained, “Only OsteoStrong® has training program certified by the Father of Osteogenic Loading, Dr. John Jauish.” There are 2 million fractures due to bone loss each year in the USA. That’s 2 million 2 many and Dee’s goal is to see that statistic change. The business offers a free assessment of suitability to the program.“We are so pleased with the wonderful response OsteoStrong® of Farragut has received”, Deesaid, “The benefits of osteogenic loading are becoming apparent. One client with advanced osteoporosis of the spine had a 25.5% increase in density verified by DEXA. The least improvement seen after 12 months of sessions at OsteoStrong® Farragut is stabilization. Most are seeing measurable increases in bone density.”

Continue Reading →

National Civil Rights Museum at the Lorraine Motel

History is often set aside as not applicable today, an issue that has plagued the Civil Rights Movement since inception. The National Civil Rights Museum offers visitors a fully immersed experience through multi-sensory and multimedia innovations combined with historical artifacts. The interactive approach allows all aspects of the historical and current Civil Rights Movement to be interpreted and applied to current times.Located in Memphis,The National Civil Rights Museum is one of the nation’s premier heritage and cultural museums. With a mission to share the lessons from the American Civil Rights Movement, the museum continues to shape equality and freedom globally.Established in 1991, the museum is located at the former Lorraine Motel. Purchased by Walter Bailey in 1945 and renamed after his wife Loree, the two-story concrete block motel structure was one of only a few hotels for which African-American travelers could enjoy accommodations during the segregated eras. Guests enjoyed its upscale atmosphere, home-cooked meals, affordable prices and clean environment. Aretha Franklin and Otis Redding were among the many who stayed at the Lorraine during the 1950s and 1960s.Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. stayed at the Lorraine Motel many times, especially during t he Memphis sanitation workers strike of 1968. A strike that grew into an important event of the Civil Rights Movement, attracting the attention of the NAACP, the national news media, and Martin Luther King Jr. He first visited the Memphis strike on March 18th, speaking to an audience of thousands at the Mason Temple. On April 3rd, King returned to Memphis and the Mason Temple delivering the “I’ve Been to the Mountaintop” address. In a prophetic finale to his speech, King revealed that he was not afraid to die: “Like anybody, I would like to live a long life—longevity has its place. But I’m not concerned about that now. I just want to do God’s will… And so I’m happy tonight; I’m not worried about anything; I’m not fearing any man. Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord ”On Thursday, April 4, 1968, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., stepped out onto the balcony of his Lorraine Motel room #306 to attend dinner at a local minister’s home. At 6:01 p.m., he was struck in the face by a single .30-06 bullet fired from a Remington Model 760 rifle. The 39 year old civil rights champion and nobel peace laureate was forever silenced. On April 8th, King’s widow, Coretta Scott King, and the couple’s four small children led a crowd estimated at forty thousand in a silent march through the streets of Memphis to honor the fallen leader and support the cause of the city’s sanitation workers.The National Civil Rights Museum is a complex of museums and historic buildings, most of which are directly associated with the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther KingJr. On October 21, 2016, the museum was honored by becoming a Smithsonian Affiliate museum. The National Civil Rights Museum and Lorraine Hotel is a place of history and symbolism for all. Step aboard a vintage bus and hear the Rosa Parks altercation in Montgomery, Alabama or crouch into the hull of a 1700s slave ship to imagine the horrid conditions they endured. The museum collection offers 260 artifacts, more than 40 new films, oral histories, interactive media and external listening posts that guide visitors through five centuries of history. It may be built with bricks and mortar, but the message delivered is enough to change the world, one visitor at a time.

Continue Reading →

Longhorn Legendary Steak

Born of fire, tested by ice, confirmed by legions of loyal guests each day, Longhorn Steakhouse has grown to become the undisputed home of steak done right.We strive to be the best steakhouse in everything we do. Bold flavors from our grill masters like the Flo’s Filet or our signature entrees like the Parmesian Crusted Chicken make us legendary here in Farragut, Tennessee. Our menu includes Longhorn fresh cut salads and Steakhouse burgers.Join us here for a mouth watering experience at our Farragut location and don’t forget to join our Longhorn eClub to get a free appetizer like our Firecracker Chicken Wraps.

Continue Reading →

Harrah’s Hope Lodge

The American Cancer Society Hope Lodge program provides lodging for cancer patients and their caregivers. It’s a nurturing community that helps patients access the care they need in a homelike environment. Guest share meals, join in evening activities or relax in their own private room.Established in 1970, the Charleston, SC Hope Lodge was the first facility in the country for cancer patients and caregivers. The concept came from Margot Freudenberg, an actively involved volunteer until she was 105, the longest-serving American Cancer Society volunteer.She saw a similar facility while traveling through Australia and New Zealand with President Eisenhower’s People to People Ambassador Program. Today, Hope Lodge are available throughout the United States and Puerto Rico serving patients and caregivers from all over the world.The American Cancer Society Hope Lodge in Memphis, which opened in 2010, offers lodging centrally located to area treatment centers. The University of Tennessee Health Science Center donated the land for the three-story facility. Aptly named Harrah’s Hope Lodge as the Caesars Foundation, owners of Harrah’s Entertainment, gifted $2,000,000 as part of their pre-opening capital campaign. Harrah’s founding partnership has continued with annual gifts and sparked a powerful connection with the local Tunica casino employees volunteering more than 500 hours annually.When choosing where to receive cancer treatment, a patient usually decides to stay close to home, however, that is not always possible. Specialized treatment can be far from home and in the situations where travel is necessary, many encounter the inability to afford those expenses. It can be a barrier for receiving the best possible care in their cancer fight, Memphis is home to many cancer specialist not found anywhere else in Tennessee. Prior to the opening in 2010, patients reported avoiding treatment, traveling extensive miles back and forth from home or sleeping in cars while parked at the treatment centers. Those barriers are broken down by the Harrah’s Hope Lodge with a staff committed to providing a nurturing environment for guests 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.The first floor of Harrah’s Hope Lodge features communal dining, kitchens, library and recreational areas, while the second and third floors have a total of 40 suites for cancer patients and a guest/caregiver. Located at 718 Union Ave. directly east of Sun Studio providing about 70 patients with a comfortable, welcoming home-away-from- home. But most importantly, Harrah’s Hope Lodge provides camaraderie. Friendships are formed as patients and caregivers take comfort in the knowledge that they’re not alone in their fight against cancer.Support from volunteers and local organizations is critical to the American Cancer Society’s mission of providing free lodging to cancer patients and their caregivers.Visit www.cancer.org to learn more about how to get involved or donate.

Continue Reading →

Hamilton Eye Center

Medical discoveries are not only made in laboratories; they also occur during the care of patients where ideas become treatments that lead to future breakthroughs. This is research made available by an atmosphere of scientists and physicians working together. The vision for a comprehensive facility where researchers, clinicians, students, nurses, and technicians work together, sharing knowledge, studying the eye and caring for patients was the innovative dream of Ralph Hamilton, MD.Dr. Hamilton began his 70-yearcareer in ophthalmology as a 15-year-old, assisting his father by shining a flashlight into the eyes of his cataract surgery patients. He was only 16 when he graduated from high school and 23 when he earned his medical degree from the University of Tennessee Health Science Center in Memphis (UTHSC). When he returned to UTHSC in 1959, Dr. Hamilton already carried the dream of establishing an eye institute in Memphis. He continued to pursue the goal throughout his career, becoming a full clinical professor in 1979 and running a busy practice.The Hamilton Eye Institute, a 60,000-square- foot facility opened in 2005, and current faculty and staff continue the threefold mission of providing advanced treatments for patient care, fostering an interplay of ideas among a community of scholars in a fertile environment for discovery, and transferring skills and knowledge to the next generation of physicians and researchers through a world-class ophthalmic medical education program. With many of the most advanced surgical training technologies available, the Hamilton Eye Institute’s educational facilities are among the finest available. Located in Midtown Memphis, the Hamilton Eye Institute provides clinical and surgical Ophthalmology services.Dr. Ralph Hamilton passed away in 2017 leaving a formidable legacy of continued discipline in providing the best care through constant collaboration and research. As one of the Mid-South’s premier vision facilities, the Hamilton Eye Institute provides facilities of leading advancement in care and research of eye diseases and conditions.

Continue Reading →

Gallaher Bend Lake House

Built in 1982, Gallaher Bend is situated on seven acres of lake front property on Melton Hill Lake in Knoxville, Tennessee. The 5,600-square foot Tennessee flagstone home was built for entertaining, with a pool, dock, and multi-level decks with gorgeous sunset views. The back lawn overlooks the lake surrounded by the East Tennessee mountains. The front lawn is vast with rolling hills and fields where whitetail deer are often seen grazing.Joe and Kathleen Atkins of JOPHOTO are Knoxville wedding photographers specializing in earthy and intimate weddings. From destination elopements to large celebrations. In 2017, they purchased Gallaher Bend and hosted the first wedding in November of the same year.

Continue Reading →

East Tennessee Foundation’s First Philanthropic Leadership Series Event Tackled the Subject of Opioid Addiction and How Charitable Efforts May Have an Impact

In April 2018, East Tennessee Foundation (ETF) granted local research nonprofit, Three 3, the opportunity to convene a workshop for community leaders and subject matter experts connected to the opioid epidemic in East Tennessee. The goal of the workshop was triple-aimed. The workshop served to better understand contributing factors of the epidemic and to identify opportunities for further cross-sector collaborations at the community level. The second aim was to produce a conceptual diagram that displays a future community network operating from within and on the periphery of the existing opioid epidemic. Understanding the system of interactions at the community level provides a pathway to the third and long-term objective: to identify collaborative interventions that achieve meaningful outcomes for those both directly and indirectly affected by the opioid crisis and inform ETF fund holders.With the grant, Three 3 was able to conduct a wide review of research articles, media reports and testimonials. Taken together with the inputs from thought leaders at the workshop, Three 3 produced a network diagram that maps various connections between agencies and key players within critical sectors within or adjacent to local communities.As a result, on October 16, 2018, ETF hosted their first PHILANTHROPIC LEADERSHIP SERIES held exclusively for fund holders entitled Breaking the Cycle of Opioid Addiction. The main objectives of the briefing were to:Inform community leaders and philanthropists on the benefit of applying a ‘systems approach’ to better understand and solve complex social problems.Identify and characterize existing collaborative programs or efforts related to substance misuse prevention and recovery in the East Tennessee region.Explore new interventions (i.e., additional programs or solutions) to strengthen the system.Dr. Mark McGrail, Director of Addiction Medicine at Cherokee Health Systems, kicked off the day with background on the progressive disease of addiction, which he defines as “a chronic disease with biological, psychological, social, and spiritual manifestations.” Dr. McGrail stated that the path to addiction often involves losing meaningful relationships with friends and family. This path tends to involve feelings of guilt, shame, and self-hatred which further contribute to the cycle of substance misuse. Because of the complex nature of the disease, a person who becomes addicted will likely require long-term ‘wrap-around’ care to reduce the obstacles leading to recovery – further underscoring the benefit of a network or systems approach for addressing the epidemic at the community level with external support. A panel moderated by Brandon Hollingsworth, News Director at WUOT, featured Dr. Robert Pack of East TN State University, Dr. Carole Myers of UT, Knoxville, and Charlene Hipsher and Phillip Martin representing a nonprofit in the Ninth Judicial District called Align9. Panel members shared their challenges and successes spearheading community level collaborative efforts to counteract this epidemic. In addition to her teaching and research roles at UT, Dr. Myers produces Health Connections, a weekly podcast featuring health care topics often related to the opioid epidemic.She emphasized that the health-care system accounts for roughly 20% of good health outcomes, but that economic policy, housing, transportation, and other community level factors influence the rest. Dr. Pack heads the ETSU Center for Prescription Drug Abuse Prevention and Treatment, which conducts research, trains health professionals, and provides evidence-based clinical care. The center also convenes stakeholders monthly to discuss current efforts and identify opportunities for collaboration. Hipsher and Martin with Align9 have “reached across the aisle” to align local resources to support an individual’s recovery efforts. These resources include support, financial planning/life skills, law enforcement, and the justice system. Martin emphasized that all these resources are critical, but overcoming stigma and productively channeling volunteers’ passion remain top priorities. Dr. Meyers’ and Dr. Pack’s efforts focus on scalable and sustainable solutions, including capacity-building within communities. Dr. Pack closed the panel by noting that preventative measures, such as life skills and parenting training, produce positive outcomes as well. He pointed to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s Communities That Care model, a risk and protective factor approach to substance misuse prevention, as a resource.Lastly, the attendees participated in a facilitated discussion to identify opportunities to support community level efforts related to prevention and recovery. Participants identified increased understanding and destigmatization of addiction as critical factors, as both upstream (prevention) and downstream (recovery) efforts. Creating a hub and spoke system of referrals that includes law enforcement (e.g. drug courts) and improved wraparound services were also priorities. From these discussions, participants generated potential next steps that ETF could take in fostering solutions to the opioid epidemic in East Tennessee.“East Tennessee Foundation is taking an active role in the effort to tackle the opioid crisis in our community. My colleagues and I at Three 3 are honored to have had the opportunity to collaborate with ETF and others across the region that are addressing this devastating epidemic our communities are burdened with.”-Bruce Tonn, President, Three 3

Continue Reading →

100th Anniversary of the Arcade Restaurant

Situated on the corner of South Main Street and G.E. Patterson is The Arcade Restaurant, a legend since 1919. Speros Zepatos immigrated from Greece to Memphis, founding the restaurant in a small, one story, wood framed building and cooking on pot belly stoves. The 1920’s style architecture seen today was the result of Speros tearing down that wood frame in 1925 and building The Arcade Building, complete with retail stores.It was the 2nd generation of Zepatos that took the Arcade to the next level in the 1950’s, adapting the fifties style experienced by today’s patrons. With Memphis coming alive in the mid 1960’s, the location became the busiest intersection in the city, so much that policeman were needed 24 hours a day to direct traffic. That excitement changed as businesses left the downtown following the decline of railroad transportation and the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., buildings were boarded up as residents headed to the outlining areas of the Memphis. The quiet did not last too long with the arrival of the most famous Memphis resident, ELVIS, who fell in love with The Arcade Restaurant, even was a regular patron for breakfast and lunch. Today, you can indulge yourself by sitting in the honorary “Elvis booth” as you fill the tummy with his favorite sandwich, a peanut butter and banana masterpiece. The King of Rock and Roll boosted the business turning The Arcade into a tourist destination.Throughout the decades, The Arcade Restaurant survived it all, becoming a historical landmark. It’s a trip back in time, something that attracted Hollywood movie studios as scenes from Mystery Train, Great Balls of Fire, The Client, The Firm, Walk the Line and too many others to name, were filmed in the restaurant.The family has given great care to preserve the old-time charm while presenting favorable menu options from the classic breakfast to “The Memphis Thang”, a smoked turkey sandwich complimented by tasty creole mustard to “Memphis Fire”, a homemade pizza with spicy marinara. Every menu item, every bite delights and the atmosphere makes everything taste better.There is a lot of history between the walls, stories from every booth, amazing food from the kitchen and traditions continue today by the 3rd generation of Zepatos. Right outside the front door is the national historic marker which honors the family who committed to the City of Memphis, continuing to positively impact the South Main Historic District. On the Bicentennial of Memphis is only fitting to wish Happy 100th Birthday to The Arcade Restaurant, the oldest restaurant and famous Memphis landmark.The Arcade Restaurant is located at 540 S. Main Street in Memphis, Tennessee

Continue Reading →